Jollof House Review- Nigerian VS Ghanaian Jollof Rice?

Last weekend I had the pleasure of visiting Jollof House UK, a brand new takeaway food service based in the heart of Brixton.

I had seen videos of enviable plates from some of my peers and heard great reviews. I knew I would need to visit as soon as possible.

I’m a huge fan of west African food and one of my goals this year is to master some of the delicious dishes that come from many of the continents dominant countries such as Nigeria and Ghana.

I prefer home cooked food that delivers passion with each bite. Paradoxically, I find that a lot of Caribbean and African restaurants lack consistency across the board because of this reason.

Jollof House is owned by chefs Mina and Cynthia who, combined, make a powerhouse of skilled cooking and intense flavours.

The Food.

Jollof House UK serves their dishes based off a multi choice menu where you can choose one or more types of meat that is then served with set sides.

I ensured I tried everything on the menu to give a full review.

First and foremost, the Jollof rice was delicious. I’m not a Jollof expert but I am an expert on flavours. One of the first questions I asked Jollof House UK was: “Is this Nigerian or Ghanaian style?”.

What makes them extremely unique is that their jollof rice is made combining methods from both Nigeria and Ghana, who both proclaim to have the best style of Jollof rice. Made with basmati, it was the perfect combination of spicy and flavourful. In the past I’ve found some versions of this dish to be oily and more heat than actual taste. I would have been happy to eat this by itself which is a great indication of good rice.

Next in my plate was a huge selection of meats.

I was one of the first to try a pilot of their lemon pepper wings and I wasn’t disappointed. The lemon wasn’t overpowering at all. The chicken was crispy on the outside and flavoured well inside. The barbecue chicken was also a great choice. It has a soft smokey barbecue flavour with a hint of sweetness.

I then got the opportunity to try two dishes I’ve never had which is ‘chofi’ and then ‘shaki’. Why did I not discover chofi sooner? For those unfamiliar with it, it is a dish of Ghanaian origin which is made with turkey tails.The meat was succulent and bursting with taste. The shaki was also really tasty. I have heard many funny stories from my Nigerian friends about shaki being tough and splashing into your eye. I don’t have any story to tell you apart from that it tastes wonderful.

I also had bbq ribs which were conveniently sliced to make them easy to eat. The meat slid off the bone and held the flavour well, a sign of great seasoning.

Finally, I got to try their version of jerk pork. I was surprisingly impressed. The pork was very tasty and flavoured well with a hint of sweetness. I have to mention here that I would personally refer to this as sweet and spicy grilled pork as opposed to jerk pork as the distinct jerk flavours that are unique to jerk, were too subtle to define the dish as this in my opinion. It was delicious nonetheless.

Besides the plethora of main dishes there were also complimenting sides.

I love their Ghanaian take on fried plantain which is called kelewele. The plantain was diced and seasoned which was very enjoyable. As well as this, the meal included a side of mac and cheese.

The mac and cheese was subtle and had three different cheeses used throughout. The mac and cheese wasn’t as cheesy and moist as I’d like it but I feel a super cheesy mac and cheese would have been a little too heavy with everything else going on. I also have to add that I like my mac and cheese super cheesy as a personal preference and not everyone does.

Final Thoughts.

I literally ate the whole meal in silence because of how amazing the food was. If you know me well, you’d know that I’m actually a very harsh critic of food so to hear that coming from me is a rare deal.

At £10 for two meat choices and sides of £12 for three and sides, this was great value as the portions were huge.

The meal was delicious, well thought out and even better executed. Minus some minor tweaks to the mac and cheese, this was virtually a flawless meal for me and they have made a loyal customer in me. Despite them being in Brixton, I urge you to visit, even if you don’t live in the area.

It was absolutely worth the journey and I can’t wait to try what else they have on the menu. You can check out their menu and order from them on Twitter or Instagram at @jollof_houseuk.

Garlic, Chilli & Lemon King Prawn and Salmon Pasta Recipe.

Seafood and pasta is a match made in culinary heaven. I am beyond obsessed with king prawns and it genuinely confuses me as to how and why they are so delicious. (Not to be dramatic or anything but if there was a choice between my friends and an unlimited supply of prawns, then… I guess my birthday would be a very lonely event.)

My favourite thing about pasta is how flexible and fool proof it is. You can take pasta from basic to luxurious or from healthy to indulgent.

I developed this recipe for seafood lovers. It is simple, healthy and tasty. There is no heavy or sugary sauce which allows the salmon and prawns to be the primary flavour of the dish. It is filling and fresh, not to mention quick. A perfect dish for when you want a full flavoured pasta dish without the guilt.

Ingredients.

  • Salmon fillet (one per person, skin removed)
  • 6-8 raw king prawns (per person)
  • Low fat margarine (or olive oil)
  • 1 spring onion (chopped)
  • 4 Cherry tomatoes (per person)
  • 2 garlic cloves (crushed)
  • Parsley
  • Lemon juice
  • Red chilli (de seeded, amount dependent on heat preference)
  • Salt
  • Black Pepper
  • Cooked pasta (spaghetti or linguine recommended)

Method.

1.     Cut your salmon fillet into equal sized chunks. (Not too small or it will overcook)

2.     Season your salmon and king prawns with some salt and black pepper (If you don’t have raw king prawns, you can use cooked but this makes a big difference to the taste.)

3.     Put some margarine into a frying pan on medium heat and add your spring onion, garlic and chilli. This will become the base to your sauce. Sautee for about 20 seconds.

4.     Add your king prawns followed by your salmon chunks. (These will cook very quickly so make sure you are attentive.)

5.     After a few minutes, once the salmon and king prawns have almost cooked through (not all the way otherwise they will be overcooked by the end), add the chopped cherry tomatoes and stir through gently.

6.      Add some more margarine to the pan and about two tablespoons of lemon juice, and then turn the heat down slightly.

7.     Add a little bit more garlic, some parsley,  salt and pepper and simmer for a couple of minutes until you have a slightly thicker sauce.

8.     Add your hot, cooked pasta to the pan and turn gently so the sauce coats all the pasta. (be careful not to be too heavy-handed as you will break up the salmon)

9.     Serve with some parsley and parmesan sprinkled on top. Enjoy!

I’d love to see how this dish came out for you! Why not post a picture of Instagram or Twitter and tag me @thefooddoll in.

The Food Doll.

Authentic Jamaican Curry Goat. 

Besides jerk chicken, this is hands down the most popular dish to come out of the Caribbean and for good reason. Being raised in Jamaica has blessed me with some of my country’s most delicious dishes as taught to me by the women of my family.


I decided to share one of my most precious dishes: Curry Goat/Curry Mutton as I know this dish can be tricky for some. Especially because Caribbean cooking rarely use measurements, instead relying on our eye and experience. Nevertheless, here is my recipe for succulent flavourful Jamaican Curry Goat.

Ingredients: 3-4lbs of goat or mutton meat cubes. salt 1.5 teaspoon, pepper 1.5 teaspoon, curry powder 6 teaspoons, pimento seeds (15), thyme (2 teaspoons), scotch bonnet (1, chopped), butter (1 tablespoon), onion (1, chopped), scallions (two sprigs, chopped) water (to cover), carrots (1-2 diced) and potatoes (1-2 diced).
Step one: mix together all the ingredients except the carrots, potatoes and butter. Leave to season overnight or at least 2 hours in the fridge.


Step Two: Add the butter in a Dutch pot or deep pot. Brown your meat on a high heat for a few minutes to seal the juices in by turning periodically.

Step three: Add enough water cover your meat and bring it to the boil.

Step four: Turn the heat down to very low and slow cook for about 2-3 hours. At 45 minutes before end of cooking, add potatoes & carrots. 

Step five: Boil some white rice or rice and peas, fry some plantain and serve with coleslaw.

Tip: The longer this dish sits before serving is generally the better it tastes. I often cook this in the morning or afternoon, then reheat it on the stove whilst preparing the rice. By this time, the meat has truly soaked up the flavour of the sauce and becomes uniquely tasty.

Enjoy!

The Food Doll ❤